Hans-Hermann Hoppe

Hans-Hermann Hoppe (born September 2, 1949) is a German-born American Austrian School economist, and paleolibertariananarcho-capitalistphilosopher. He is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Senior Fellow of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, former Editor of the Journal of Libertarian Studies, a lifetime member of the Royal Horticultural Society and the founder and president of the Property and Freedom Society.

Works

(1976). Handeln und Erkennen
[Action and cognition] (in German)

(1983). Kritik der kausalwissenschaftlichen Sozialforschung
[Critique of causal scientific social research]


(1987). Eigentum, Anarchie und Staat
[Property, anarchy, and the state] (in German)


(1989). A Theory of Socialism and Capitalism

Here is Hans Hoppe's first treatise in English — actually his first book in English — and the one that put him on the map as a social thinker and economist to watch. He argued that there are only two possible archetypes in economic affairs: socialism and capitalism. All systems are combinations of those two types. The capitalist model he defines as pure protection of private property, free association, and exchange - no exceptions. All deviations from that ideal are species of socialism, with public ownership and interference with trade.

(1995). Economic Science and the Austrian Method

A definitive defense of the methodological foundations of Austrian economics.

Hoppe sets the praxeological view (economics as a purely deductive science) against positivism, while taking the critics of the Austrian approach head on. Hans-Hermann Hoppe rests his argument on the Kantian idea of the "synthetic apriori" proposition, thereby expanding an aim of Mises's in the methodology section of Human Action.

(2001). Democracy: The God That Failed

This sweeping book is a systematic treatment of the historic transformation of the West from limited monarchy to unlimited democracy. Revisionist in nature, it reaches the conclusion that monarchy, with all its failings, is a lesser evil than mass democracy, but outlines deficiencies in both as systems of guarding liberty. By focusing on this transformation from private to public government, the author is able to interpret many historical phenomena, such as rising levels of crime, degeneration of standards of conduct and morality, the decline in security and freedom, and the growth of the mega-state.

(2006). The Economics and Ethics of Private Property

Austrian economics puts private property at the center of its analysis of value, price, and exchange. Respect for private property is also implied by the fundamental moral principle, "Do not steal."

Hans-Hermann Hoppe has devoted his life's work to the economics and ethics of private property. This book collects some of Hoppe's most important essays on this topic. Hoppe, a leading student and colleague of Murray Rothbard whose works have been translated into a dozen languages, explores the economic, ethical, sociological, and historical aspects of private property, showing how property rights are vital to all aspects of society: employment, interest, money, banking, trade cycles, taxes, public goods, war, imperialism, and the rise and fall of civilizations.

The Myth of National Defense. Essays on the Theory and History of Security Production

The libertarian idea of society without a state appeals to many people, but, however enticing the idea, it is often dismissed as utopian. How could an anarchist society defend itself against large, centralized states? Defense, it has been alleged, cannot be adequately supplied by the free market. It is what economists term “public good.”